What Can YOU Do To Help ?

One of the most popular questions we're asked is "What can I do to help?" 

 You don't have to be rich or have a ton of free-time on your hands to make a difference .

Below, we have listed several different ways you can support our mission in reducing the number of unwanted pets in the United States. 

Monetary Donation

All donations, regardless of size, are greatly appreciated. Every dollar counts. 

Click the photo below to be directed to our donation page.

Image by Kat Yukawa

Talk About It

You'd be surprised by how many people choose to purchase pets just because they aren't aware of the pet overpopulation problem in the U.S. or they just don't know where they could find the type of pet they're looking for. Talking to just one person about these issues could help encourage them to save a life instead of purchase their next pet.

Suggesting websites like PetFinder.com and AdoptAPet.com to help a friend find their next pet is a great way to promote adoption- most people are shocked at just how many adoptable pets there are out there!

Image by Priscilla Du Preez

Advertise 

Wear our logo out in public to get other people wondering what TPR is! It can be a great conversation starter and a perfect way to meet fellow animal lovers.

Click the photo below to be directed to our online shop.

fullsizeoutput_218b.jpeg

Promote Responsible Pet Ownership

A great number of people who don't have their pets spayed/neutered, microchipped, vaccinated or on preventative

medication say it's because they don't have the time or money to get the services done, they don't know where to get them done at or they just don't understand why their pet needs to have these services done in the first place. If you know a friend that falls into one of the categories above, you can help make a difference by: 

  •  Using Google to search for local low-cost & free clinics in your area and forwarding the links to your friend.

  • Offering to drive your friends pet to the clinic to get the service done for them.

  • Offering to pay for or split the cost of the services.

  • Forward your friend the contact information to your personal vet so they feel more comfortable going somewhere they can trust.

Volunteer

TPR does not currently have a volunteer program open to everyone, but we hope that doesn't discourage you from volunteering at your local shelter or rescue. It only takes a few minutes to google local animal-care facilities and contact them to ask if they're in need of a volunteer.

Volunteering not only helps the pets and the shelter/rescue, but it can also be a great way to meet new friends that share the same passion! 

Social Media

Follow our accounts, interact with our posts, & share with your friends! Social media is a great tool to use to spread the word about organizations and causes you care about. 

Your post could be the reason why someone adopts instead of shops for their next pet.

Foster

If you are interested in fostering for TPR, please fill out the adoption application and type "FOSTER" when it asks for the dog you're interested in adopting. 

Fostering a pet is one of the most rewarding experiences. Not only are you freeing up room and resources at the shelter or rescue for them to save another animal, you're providing your foster pet the experience they need to succeed in a home of their own once they're adopted.

Owning a pet can be a 20yr commitment! Before taking on such a huge responsibility like adopting, fostering can be a great way to help you decide if you're ready to adopt a pet of your own. 

Encourage Others To THINK Before Adding A New Member To The Family

People often jump into pet ownership without realizing how much responsibility they're taking on, which typically results in the animal being neglected or needing to be re--homed. You can help people understand the responsibilities of pet ownership by doing the following: 

  1. Suggest that they consider fostering from their local shelter first; some shelters will provide you with everything you need to take care of the cat or dog including toys, food, litter box, collar or harness, a crate, and any veterinary care that they need. Just remind them to tell the shelter first if they can only foster for a certain period of time. 

  2. Suggest that they look into becoming a petsitter/dog walker if they really just miss having a pet. This is especially helpful for the individuals that are in college or aren't able to own a pet at the moment, but still want to get their dog or cat "fix."

  • Facebook
  • YouTube
  • Instagram
  TracysPawsRescue is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization 84-3933841